How to fall in love
Marilyn Monroe’s bubble bath

Marilyn Monroe’s bubble bath

It was said that the American icon, as famous for her eccentricities as for her talents as an actress, used to bathe in champagne in order to relax. Bear in mind, however, that you’ll need around 150 bottles in order to enjoy a relaxing Brut bubble bath…
Champagne, that’s life!
Champagne, that’s life!

Champagne, that’s life!

The sound of champagne flutes clinking together, the exchanged looks of the guests, and the fizzing bubbles… this curious custom, which dates back to the Middle Ages, was originally intended to prove that the guests hadn’t been poisoned; the ritual then involved banging the glasses together quite violently, sending splashes of your drink into your neighbour’s glass, and vice versa. Good Health!
Sparkling beauty

Sparkling beauty

Could the champagne region hold the secret of eternal beauty? The antioxidant virtues of champagne have long been acknowledged, and result from the double fermentation process invented in the 17th century. They are now used in cosmetics for the manufacture of anti-ageing and beauty creams.
Autour du champagne
Champagne is the ultimate refreshment to offer guests at a wedding. A traditional symbol of wealth thanks to its golden colour, it is the perfect way to wish the new family founded by the happy couple a lifetime of success, love and happiness. Can champagne be drunk throughout the happy occasion? Of course: brut champagne is ideal for the cocktail party, blanc de blancs goes perfectly with fish dishes during the dinner, and finally rosé with the dessert and the cutting of the cake! Kept perfectly chilled throughout the reception, champagne is undoubtedly one of the most potent symbols of anyone’s wedding day.
A turn to the left

A turn to the left

250 years after Marie-Antoinette of Austria, it was the turn of Kate Moss to serve as a model – her left breast, to be more precise – for the creation of a champagne coupe. Produced in France by the Cristallerie d’Arques, coupes are considered by the experts to be too wide-mouthed to allow champagne to reveal its finest qualities. But even served in a coupe, champagne will undoubtedly awaken even the sleepiest of taste buds.
Champagne in the Baltic Sea
Champagne in the Baltic Sea

Champagne in the Baltic Sea

168 bottles of champagne from some of the most illustrious producers – including the famous and now defunct Maison Juglar – were discovered in 2010 in the Baltic Sea. 55 metres under water, the bottles dated back to the 1830s, barely later than the world’s oldest champagnes. Produced in 1825, there are now just two bottles remaining. Historians take note!
Autour du champagne
Autour du champagne
Valentine’s Day is one of the best occasions to share a bottle of champagne with your loved one. The ultimate Wine of Love, Brut Rosé champagne is the perfect accompaniment to a romantic dinner for two. Placed in an ice bucket with ice and water, it will always be at the ideal temperature to refresh your taste buds. Its fine colourful bubbles are the ideal partner to any meal. Out of love for the champagne, you should always respect the rules of service and only fill your glasses half way up. This will ensure that you enjoy the subtlety and richness of the wine at its very best, and share a toast with your loved one as frequently as possible! Brut Rosé champagne is the perfect counterpoint to your canapés, foie gras on toast, or smoked salmon. To accompany the dessert course, choose a Blanc de Blancs, which is sure to add a welcome and refreshing touch of sweetness.
Champagne’s night life

Champagne’s night life

Champagne and daylight are not the best of friends. This is why the bottles are usually made of thick, opaque glass. Champagne that is over-exposed to daylight will develop an unpleasant “taste of light” with subtle notes of cauliflower and rubber.
The finer points of language
The finer points of language

The finer points of language

Cracking open a bottle of champagne with a sabre, or “sabrer le champagne”, is a practice that was initiated by Napoleon’s Imperial Guard. To celebrate their victories and impress the ladies, they would decapitate champagne bottles with a masterful sweep of their sabres. In French, to “sabler” one’s glass of champagne is to knock it back. Please note that the two activities are not incompatible!
You lose some, you win some

You lose some, you win some

“A boat that hasn’t tasted wine will taste blood”. This old English proverb refers to the ancient tradition, whose origins are lost in the mists of time, which consists of smashing a bottle of champagne on the hull of ships before their first voyage. It is said that the Titanic set sail without being baptised…
Autour du champagne
Champagne takes off

Champagne takes off

The world’s first international aviation competition was held in 1909, the “Grande Semaine d’Aviation de la Champagne”. The tradition of drinking champagne at mechanical sports events dates back to this first meeting, preferably on the podiums after the race!
Autour du champagne
Autour du champagne
Champagne is the wine of love and joy. An essential element at any grand occasion, it can also be enjoyed quite simply for the pleasure. Serve chilled but not ice cold; ideally it should be plunged for 20 minutes in a champagne bucket filled with a half-and-half mixture of cold water and ice. The choice of glass is also important in order to enjoy champagne at its best. Though champagne is often served in champagne coupes, these are in fact too wide-mouthed, which causes a rapid loss of bubbles. A champagne flute is far preferable; its tall, elegant shape and smaller diameter helps the champagne to retain its effervescence for longer as well as concentrating all its aromas.
Emulating Icarus

Emulating Icarus

Frank Hedges Butler, a lover of both aeronautics and effervescent drinks, became famous for his rather unorthodox use of champagne. He used full champagne bottles as ballast when flying over the English countryside in his hot-air balloon. Once drunk, the daring flyer merely needed to relieve himself in order to sail upwards towards his dreams of altitude.
Autour du champagne
Whether you’re celebrating with family or friends, Christmas and New Year are always the perfect excuse to uncork a bottle of champagne. Brut, Blanc de Blancs or Rosé, each champagne variety has its own personality. Joyous partygoers will choose a chilled Rosé to start the festivities off with a swing, while lovers of tenderer and more subtle pleasures will turn to the calmer and more measured Blanc de Blancs. Devotees of absolute authenticity, on the other hand, may prefer a vintage Brut, for the ultimate and timeless classic taste. Ideally, champagne should be served between 8° and 10°C depending on its age and maturity, in order to allow all its aromas to blossom and express themselves fully. As delicious to drink as it is to look at, it will take pride of place in a champagne bucket, where it will splendidly and elegantly decorate your dining table.
Explosive champagne
Explosive champagne

Explosive champagne

Producing champagne used to be a hazardous activity. It wasn’t until the end of the 18th century that producers managed to tame champagne’s wild and effervescent nature, thanks to the use of stronger and thicker glass bottles… from England.
Coming down is all the sweeter
Coming down is all the sweeter

Coming down is all the sweeter

Champagne can be drunk anywhere, even on top of the world. Many mountain climbers have celebrated their climbs to the world’s highest summits by cracking open a bottle of bubbly. Indeed, it was champagne that astronaut Jean-Loup Chrétien asked for in 1982 right after his voyage in the Soviet space capsule – the perfect way to celebrate the first space flight by a Frenchman!
« Champagne inspires wonder »

« Champagne inspires wonder »

Georges Sand